Open mic gigs and being to loud…

Just finished talking with a tavern owner and supporter of live and live open mics… as a matter of fact if it wasn’t for this venue owner, musicians of this particular local town would need to drive another hour to reach another open mic scene.

Bottom line and a wake up call for us musicians and an insight that marketers have known for many decades… “You do not know what patrons want until you ask them what they want, and then support them with what ‘they’ want!”

Meaning… Don’t think that the venue patrons are attending just to hear your amps cranked, pointing at their ears loud enough to make their conversations turn into a shouting match.

This owner opened up to me ‘big time’! She goes…
“Look, I’m happy to open my establishment up to open mic musicians (and of course pay the house band for its backline) for sure, but, when I see over 50% of my potential buyers of food and drink turn immediately around and leave because they can’t hear themselves think, let alone try to talk over the jammers that are trying to prove how bitch-en they are on stage then, unless they come up with a way to turn it down’ or maybe turn their amps toward themselves and ‘not forward’ and stop thinking they are the center of attention, well maybe it’s time to just shut er’ down!”

side bar: Musicians don’t buy enough drinks or food on their own to pay for the doors to be open.

So the question gets turned on its ear… ?- Maybe some new reasoning needs to be created, busting down the old paradigm. Maybe the new is… ‘listen to the patrons’ and stop trying to be the main attraction and become background to their ‘wants’ (and play as your own gig)!… Unless of course, you ‘are’ the center of attention as a big touring act and they’re paying you the big bucks to see you play… and (sorry) that ain’t a cover band btw!

The old saying… “we ain’t done it that way before” needs to be ‘busted’!

It’s a tough one for us prima-donna musicians, thinking we’re the center of attention.

Let’s find some new ways to jam but make the jam to and within ourselves and let the natural bleed of the freqs hit the audience so that they can both, enjoy their conversations during the music and appreciate our delivery.

Jam On!
Ron

Leave a Reply

Here's How They Work
Ron Greene Music Dials

Interview with Ron Greene

  • We’re Back!… Vinyl Records June 17, 2018
    Not to long ago I talked about the rise and fall of Tower Records and how the vinyl record industry had their days and then essentially died… well get ready because they’re back! Many of you vinyl aficionados already knew this was happening. The fact that pressed records remain dynamically pure and essentially a great […]
  • Recording Music In Your Living Room… June 12, 2018
    Having a studio in your own pad is great feeling. Being able to stroll over a couple of rooms and find yourself immersed in the comfortable surroundings of musical gear is a treat indeed. In an article from Billboard, Country singer, Tenille Townes, did a fair amount of her latest album using her living room […]
  • Gibson guitar company facing bankruptcy February 19, 2018
    If you’re like me you appreciate a good Gibson guitar. My favorite was a 1957 Les Paul Jr. single cut-away with a single P-90 pick up… it was a simple screamer! Now it appears that Gibson is in some sort of financial trouble and could be on the verge of bankruptcy after over 115 years […]
  • Paul McCartney Playing Live… December 26, 2017
    “Some of that natural reverb gets initiated by the stage sound itself, as things get pretty loud up there. Only Wickens wears in-ear monitors, as the rest of the band opts for Clair R4 sidefills and old-school Showco SRM wedges.” That’s a quote from the interesting article that talks about the equipment used on Paul […]
  • Guitar Legend John McLaughlin Retires December 15, 2017
    Jazz-rock legacy of the Mahavishnu Orchestra, John McLaughlin (age 75 at the time of this blog post) is retiring from touring. Many of us musicians have known John as an esoteric monster on the strings. His departure from mainstream songs to introspective nuance has been instrumental (no pun intended) in providing for insightful creative considerations […]