Using Guitar Chord Charts

Guitar chord charts…

Guitar chord charts are a systematic way to learn how to play chords on a guitar. To be able to read the charts, you must first know the different types of chords- major, minor, and dominant seventh. It is important to know what type of chord you are playing when reading the chart so that you can choose which finger numbers your will use in order from index (1) through pinky (4). For example, if you see a “C” on the chart and it says “3 3 3 4,” this means that your index (1), ring finger (2), middle finger (3), and pinky finger (4) will be used in order from left to right.

Guitar Chord Reference Dial…

The guitar chord reference dial is a device that is used to help guitar players learn chords and songs. The device displays the name of each chord, as well as its fingering and the strings that should be played. The beginner can also move their fingers around on the dial for quick reference to different chords.

A guitar chord reference dial helps many guitar players learn chords and songs in a more efficient way than trying to memorize every song note by note. Just by looking at it, you will know which string needs to be strummed, what string should be your ring finger, which one should be your middle finger, and so on.

Music Dials Guitar Chords Chart

Front shows 12 charts, each showing all the chord forms and positions for each major & minor chord. Back shows 12 charts, each showing all the chord forms and positions for each augmented & diminished chord. Also shown are the notes for 7th chords.

Forget those big fat cumbersome chord books. Take a look at a complete guitar chord reference on a simple easy to use 2-sided movable dial. Fits into your instrument case.

Jam On!
Ron Greene
Founder of the Music Dials Charts

Transposing Music Using Charts

Transposition Music Charts

Consider an example of a C major chord. The root note, C can be transposed to other keys by moving it up or down the scale. For example, the same chord in D major would be followed by the notes D-E-F-G-A. If we wanted to play this chord in A minor, it would go A-C#-E (or E as a sharp).

When musicians want to play music that has been written for a different key than they are playing it at, they will often transpose it. This is done either by playing an instrument in a different key or singing or performing with different instruments and voices that are tuned to match the notes of the song being played.

You might consider using a transposing chart…

– Like the Music Dials Transposition Chart

Transposition Music Charts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A single piece of sheet music could be used for many songs in different keys because all of these songs have at least one note which is common between them (i.e., they share at least one note with each other).

When sheet music is transposed into another key, not only do all of these common notes change but also some unexpected ones may change too! Often times there will be two options: one which uses sharps and another which uses flats.

Jam On!
Ron Greene
Founder of the Music Dials Charts

Charlie Watts of the Rolling Stones Died

Wow, usually the drummer is the individual that out-lasts the rest of the band (generally) till death. Not that it matters and especially in this instance… Yet, every instance counts!

Here we go… Charlie Watts of the Rolling Stones has passed this day Tuesday, August 24th 2021, ‘He was just fu*kn 80 fsg!.’

Damn!

Figuring that Charlie joined the Rolling Stones in 1963 we might as well consider him as the/our most original ‘rock drummer’ icon! (eh?)

Anyway, wow, a wacky day in the life of seeing an original rock ‘n Roll r’ absorbed into the ether.

Hopefully we hold on to rock for many, many, generations to come!

Jam On!

-Ron
Music Dials .com

Credit is given: rollingsonte.com and journalist, Joe Gross @ https://www.npr.org/people/2100615/jon-hamilton

As noted in this article…

“He passed away peacefully in a London hospital earlier [Tuesday] surrounded by his family.” The statement referred to Watts as “one of the greatest drummers of his generation!”

It continues…

Watts’ death comes several weeks after it was announced that the drummer would not be able to perform on the Rolling Stones’ No Filter Tour of U.S. stadiums. “Charlie has had a procedure which was completely successful, but his doctors this week concluded that he now needs proper rest and recuperation,” a rep for the band said in a statement at the time. “With rehearsals starting in a couple of weeks, it’s very disappointing to say the least, but it’s also fair to say no one saw this coming.”

Read more for yourself here…
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/charlie-watts-rolling-stones-drummer-dead-obit-1161926/

What Are Chord Progressions in Music?…

According to Wikipedia… “In a musical composition, a chord progression or harmonic progression is a succession of chords. Chord progressions are the foundation of harmony in Western musical tradition from the common practice era of Classical music to the 21st century. Chord progressions are the foundation of Western popular music styles and traditional music. In these genres, chord progressions are the defining feature on which melody and rhythm are built.”

The sponsor of this Musician’s Blog is the Music Dials, which are effective at-a-glance visual reference guides for showing you the best sounding musical scale notes for playing solos and chords for accompaniment in every key.

Enjoy playing your instrument by watching and learning more here…

The Music Dials Charts Working Example

Your brain uses left side to make sense of lyrics and the right side for a song’s melody…

As a musician, you might be interested in knowing how you can separate melody from lyrics within your own brain.

We found this article of interest, as it also helps the song-writer as well as the musician playing tunes, to discover some insights on how it all comes together in the brain.

Since there’s evidence that a song is separated into two paths through the brain, it’s interesting to note (pun intended – hehe) how the musician combines the essence of both into one pleasurable listening experience.

Take a look-see yourself to understand how this might assist with your music experiences.

Jam On!

-Ron
Music Dials .com

left right brain on music

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credit is given: npr.org and journalist, Jon Hamilton @ https://www.npr.org/people/2100615/jon-hamilton

As noted in this article…

“A song fuses words and music. Yet the human brain can instantly separate a song’s lyrics from its melody.

And now scientists think they know how this happens.

A team led by researchers at McGill University reported in Science Thursday that song sounds are processed simultaneously by two separate brain areas – one in the left hemisphere and one in the right.

“On the left side you can decode the speech content but not the melodic content, and on the right side you can decode the melodic content but not the speech content,” says Robert Zatorre, a professor at McGill University’s Montreal Neurological Institute.”

Learn and read more here…
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2020/02/27/810049050/how-the-brain-teases-apart-a-songs-words-and-music

Duane Allman’s 1957 Gibson Les Paul Played On “Layla” Sells for Big Buck$

Collecting guitars can not only be fun but profitable. Case in point, in early August 2019 Duane Allman’s ’57 Les Paul Goldtop that was used to track parts of “Layla” sold for one and a quarter ($1.25) million dollars.

Greg’s Gibson SG played on the band’s, At Fillmore East live album, sold for almost $600k. Yet to date the top auction seller for collectable classic rock nostalgia instrument played by rockers is still, Jerry Garcia’s, ‘Wolf’ guitar.

In this article you’ll discover a list of other famous musician guitars that sold for some big bucks.

Keep on collecting and jamming!

-Ron

Duane Allman’s ’57 Les Paul Goldtop

The 1957 Goldtop was Duane’s main guitar during the first two years of the Allman Brothers Band, and was used to play on recordings included on the famous rock band’s first two studio albums. Most notably, it was the guitar used by Duane to play on the famous outro solo of Eric Clapton and Derek and the Dominos’ 1970 anthem, “Layla”.

In more recent years, the guitar has been used by notable players including… >Learn more here<

Credit given: Tom Shackleford via:liveforlivemusic.com

Tapping on Guitar… who started it?

Mid 70’s Eddie Van Halen. Stanley Jordan, “Eleanor Rigby” Newport Jazz Festival 1986… Mmmmm, whom really came up with the guitar tapping concept?

Still out for discussion but I’ve located a (French) gent that provides a few taps in the mid 60’s that might shed (and shred) some light on this matter… and he ‘rips it’ !

No dis-respect to Eddie and Stanley, yet this fellow just might had inspired such. (?)

You have any ‘earlier’ references?

Jam On!
-Ron

 

credit given via (https://youtu.be/d09pnxTSnT4)

 

More Chick Rockers

As time marches on in the rock genre’ every decade introduces new young female rockers that bring a special light to the music industry.

Wolf Alice, Camp Cope, Mitski, Sophie Allison, Lindsey Jordan… have you heard them? Well you should let their musical candy bestow upon your ears.

It’s great to see rock n’ roll is alive and well and will probably survive at least another generation (going on 70 years now)!

Some of these powerful chick singers are accompanied by band members consisting of both, all girls, boys, or a combination thereof.

Check out the article below, which will provide you with more insights about some of the ‘many’ lady rockers to hit the recent rock scene…

Jam On!
Ron

(credit given via, for, The Ringer .com)

As this article points out…

“When I say feminine album, immediately the perception is that it must be soft and lovely, but I mean feminine in the violent sense. Desiring, but not being able to define your desire, wanting power but being powerless and blaming it on yourself, or just hurting yourself as a way to let out the aggression in you. It’s a lot of pent-up anger or desire without a socially acceptable outlet.”

Read more here…

https://www.theringer.com/features/2018/9/5/17820522/mitski-camp-cope-snail-mail-women-rock-stars

We’re Back!… Vinyl Records

Not to long ago I talked about the rise and fall of Tower Records and how the vinyl record industry had their days and then essentially died… well get ready because they’re back!

Many of you vinyl aficionados already knew this was happening. The fact that pressed records remain dynamically pure and essentially a great way to archive recorded material, makes the vinyl application a great consideration for recordings of music.

This article from The RollingStone highlights some of the latest sales numbers as they associate with the CD and Vinyl marketplace.

Jam On!
Ron


(credit given to for RollingStone)

“When vinyl sales started to climb in 2006, some experts saw it as a fad. No longer: Those sales hit a 25-year high last year, and labels are investing in more sophisticated packaging than ever… many artists have taken note; Bruce Springsteen released his latest box set, The Album Collection Vol. 2, 1987-1996, exclusively on vinyl, with no CD option.”

Read More on Vinyl Recordings here…
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/owning-music-buying-vinyl-cds-downloads-streaming-w521504

Recording Music In Your Living Room…

Having a studio in your own pad is great feeling. Being able to stroll over a couple of rooms and find yourself immersed in the comfortable surroundings of musical gear is a treat indeed.

In an article from Billboard, Country singer, Tenille Townes, did a fair amount of her latest album using her living room surroundings for her initial tracks.

If you happen to have your own personal studio in your home, then… “You lucky dog, you!”

Jam On!
-Ron

Credit given Billboard.com 6/12/2018 by

Tenille Townes just released her debut EP on Sony Music Nashville in April, a four-song collection titled Living Room Worktapes. Though the EP wasn’t actually recorded in a living room, the raw way Townes and her co-writers wrote every track — with nothing but a melody and a guitar — is similar to the realness that a setting like that allows.

“I love a living room — it makes me think of my family and the safe spot where we can talk about anything,” Townes tells Billboard.